Previous owner did all the expensive work for you!

12310 Trailing Oaks, Live Oak TX 78233
Listed at 100,000
TX8A3577_8_6W-
Get this house at a great price and make it your own with some paint and small cosmetic fixes.  Get out of the heat and come feel the cool breeze, AC has recently been replaced with all new duct work! Roof, siding, laminate flooring, upgraded cabinetry, appliances, faux wood blinds, windows and water heater. And for those outdoor lovers…
plush grass, covered patio, shed with wired electric, lawn lighting and sprinkler system all wrapped up with a new fence!

 

Your home deserves a little LOVE too!

Brand New Ranch in North San Antonio!

2511 Towncliff Cir, San Antonio TX 78238
Active Option at $162,000

towncliff

Welcome home to this recently built home in an established neighborhood. This home boasts 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms plus an office/study. Features include vaulted ceilings, fireplace, breakfast bar and covered front patio. The deluxe master suite has multiple closets, large bathroom, high ceilings.

SEE MORE PHOTOS HERE!

Are you a Veteran? Find out how you can purchase a home using your VA benefit!

Eligibility

To be eligible for a VA Loan, veterans, active duty service members, National Guard members and reservists must meet the basic service requirements set forth by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Spouses of military members who died while on active duty or as a result of a service-connected disability may also be eligible.

It’s ultimately up to the VA to determine eligibility for the home loan program, but prospective borrowers can get a good idea by looking at the VA’s basic eligibility guidelines.

You may be eligible for a VA Home Loan if you meet one or more of the following conditions:

  • You have served 90 consecutive days of active service during wartime, OR
  • You have served 181 days of active service during peacetime, OR
  • You have more than 6 years of service in the National Guard or Reserves, OR
  • You are the spouse of a service member who has died in the line of duty or as a result of a service-related disability.

Buying Process

How to Apply for a VA Loan Certificate of Eligibility (COE)

While you don’t need your VA Certificate of Eligibility in hand to start the loan process with Veterans United, this certificate is a very important part of your loan application. Your COE verifies that your length and character of service make you eligible to use the VA home loan benefit.

You can apply for a VA Loan Certificate of Eligibility three different ways:

  1. Apply through a VA approved lender
  2. Apply online through the VA’s eBenefits portal
  3. Apply by mail with VA Form 26-1880

Get a Certificate of Eligibility

The Certificate of Eligibility (COE) verifies to the lender that you meet the eligibility requirements for a VA loan. Learn more about the evidence you submit and how to apply for a COE on our Eligibility page.

Find a Home and Sign a Purchase Agreement

Work with a real estate professional and negotiate a purchase agreement. Make sure the purchase and sales agreement contains a “VA Option Clause.”

Here’s a sample of a “VA Option Clause”:

“It is expressly agreed that, notwithstanding any other provisions of this contract, the purchaser shall not incur any penalty by forfeiture of earnest money or otherwise be obligated to complete the purchase of the property described herein, if the contract purchase price or cost exceeds the reasonable value of the property established by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The purchaser shall, however, have the privilege and option of proceeding with the consummation of this contract without regard to the amount of the reasonable value established by the Department of Veterans Affairs.”

You may also want the purchase agreement to allow you to “escape” from the contract without penalty if you can’t get a VA loan.

Apply for your VA Loan

Work with the lender to complete a loan application and gather the needed documents, such as pay stubs and bank statements.

Loan Processing

How to Apply

Purchase Loan & Cash-Out Refinance: VA loans are obtained through a lender of your choice once you obtain a Certificate of Eligibility (COE). You can obtain a COE through eBenefits, by mail, and often through you lender. Learn More

Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan: A new Certificate of Eligibility (COE) is not required. You may take your Certificate of Eligibility to show the prior use of your entitlement or your lender may use our e-mail confirmation procedure in lieu of a certificate of eligibility. Learn More

Native American Direct Loan (NADL) Program: First, confirm that your tribal organization participates in the VA direct loan program. NADL loans are obtained through a lender of your choice once you obtain a Certificate of Eligibility (COE). You can obtain a COE through eBenefits, by mail, and often through you lender. Learn More

Adapted Housing Grants: You can apply for an SAH or SHA grant by either downloading and completing VA Form 26-4555 (PDF) and submitting it to your nearest Regional Loan Center, or completing the online application. Learn More

 

Closing

The lender chooses a title company, an attorney, or one of their own representatives to conduct the closing.

 

Loan Fees

VA Funding Fee

Generally, all Veterans using the VA Home Loan Guaranty benefit must pay a funding fee. This reduces the loan’s cost to taxpayers considering that a VA loan requires no down payment and has no monthly mortgage insurance. The funding fee is a percentage of the loan amount which varies based on the type of loan and your military category, if you are a first-time or subsequent loan user, and whether you make a down payment. You have the option to finance the VA funding fee or pay it in cash, but the funding fee must be paid at closing time.

You do not have to pay the fee if you are a:

  • Veteran receiving VA compensation for a service-connected disability, OR
  • Veteran who would be entitled to receive compensation for a service-connected disability if you did not receive retirement or active duty pay, OR
  • Surviving spouse of a Veteran who died in service or from a service-connected disability

The funding fee for second time users who do not make a down payment is slightly higher. Also, National Guard and Reserve Veterans pay a slightly higher funding fee percentage. To determine your exact percentage, please review the latest funding fee chart.

Other Loan Costs

Be aware that the lender charges interest, in addition to closing fees and charges. Here are some general rules:

  • The lender, not VA, sets the interest rate, discount points, and closing costs. These rates may vary from lender to lender
  • Closing costs such as the VA appraisal, credit report, state and local taxes, and recording fees may be paid by the purchaser, the seller, or shared
  • The seller can pay for some closing costs. (Under our rules, a seller’s “concessions” can’t exceed 4% of the loan. But only some types of costs fall under this 4% rule. Examples are: payment of pre-paid closing costs, VA funding fee, payoff of credit balances or judgments for the Veteran, and funds for temporary “buydowns.” Payment of discount points is not subject to the 4% limit.)
  • You are not allowed to pay for the termite report, unless the loan is a refinance. That fee is usually paid by the seller.
  • No commissions, brokerage fees, or “buyer broker” fees may be charged to the Veteran buyer

Adding the VA Funding Fee and other loans costs to your loan may result in a situation in which you owe more than the fair market value of the house, and will reduce the benefit of refinancing since your payment will not be lowered as much as it could be. Also, you could have difficulty selling the house for enough to pay off your loan balance.

Hundreds Flock to The Sahara To Buy Everything

By Amanda Finnegan

There are rules to a liquidation sale, you know. Just because you are guarding that prime rib cart, that doesn’t make it yours. And there’s no bargaining or bartering, either — at least not on the first day.

But one of the foremost rules at the Sahara liquidation sale Thursday were words that probably had never been spoken inside the Sahara in its 58-year history.

“There is no smoking,” Don Hayes, who is overseeing the sale for National Content Liquidators, boomed over the microphone as the first buyers began to trickle in.

To protect the artifacts, of course.

More than 600,000 items were up for grabs at the first day of the two-month liquidation sale at the closed Sahara Hotel, which shut its doors just a month ago. That includes every dish, piece of silverware, housekeeping vacuum and toilet, yet another sign that a wrecking ball will most likely be the next patron to enter the empty Strip property.

Hopeful buyers lined up during the early morning hours Thursday to grab a piece of one of the last standing casinos from Las Vegas’ early boom years. The line started at the entrance of the Sahara and stretched to Paradise Road.

Hours into it, buyers were still waiting outside in the heat to get a glimpse of what was for sale inside.

Some buyers came on a mission with a particular piece in mind, heading straight for the black and white posters of Elvis or Johnny Carson, while others browsed and stocked up on framed prints from the hotel rooms, slot machine chairs and waste baskets.

Louis Bowl of Barstow, Calif., and his family scooped a frame photo of Elvis during one his visits to the Sahara and two poker tables.

“We headed over here about 6 a.m. and were the 40th in line. We’re looking for collectibles and a poker table,” Bowls said.

No more than an hour later, his family had a corner sectioned off with the casino floor with scores of items, and they were still going. Bowls said his group didn’t have a price limit.

The priciest item on the casino floor was the currency change desk at the casino cage, priced at $28,000. Next might have been one of Sahara’s famous camels, which everyone talked about but no one could afford at $12,000.

Even though most of the more memorable, moderately priced items were gone within the first few hours of the sale, Greg Hall, operations director for the sale, said they expect the sale to go the full 60 days.

“It’s going fantastic. Things are running smooth, everything’s going good, and we’ve got a great crowd,” Hall said about the first day of the sale.

He reported no scuffles on the sale floor so far, all accept for a small argument over a fake tree between two groups hoarding their loot on opposite sides of the casino floor.

But the hot-ticket items of the day were the camel lamps from the rooms. Priced at $150 a piece, buyers headed to the cashier set up at the registration desk with armfuls of the 700-of-a-kind, only-at-Sahara piece. Mary Lane Slack of Las Vegas wheeled a cart full of the camel lamps to the cashier, grabbing a piece of a casino she remembers as a glitzier place during her childhood.

Slack’s mother ran a children’s shop across the street from the Sahara called Small Fry, which she said was frequented by the stars who performed at the Sahara.

“The sale is fun, but it’s really sad. I can remember coming down here for dinner with my parents as a kid. The whole thing is sad because it seems like they are going to tear it down,” Slack said.

The lamps were all Slack had time to grab, but she said she still had her eye on a karaoke sign in one of the lounge areas for nostalgia’s sake.

Upstairs, buyers sized up the Sahara’s presidential and admiral suites and their early 1990s furnishings. The suites seemed more like a place where furnishings went to get a second life rather than luxury hotel rooms, with mismatched artwork hanging from the walls and worn throw rugs thrown over even more worn carpeting.

Other items for sale in the suites included bidets for $75, sink vanities for $200, $100 for artwork and $250 brass embellished doors, reading “presidential suite.”

Potential shoppers wait in line just before the opening of the first day of the Sahara liquidation sale Thursday, June 16, 2011. Nearly every item is for sale and were priced and sold as is, where is and on a first come basis.

But cassette player stereo systems and the mirrors over the beds in the suites didn’t have price tags. Their value must have been immeasurable.

Bob and Shirley Barrett of North Las Vegas, both in their Sahara T-shirts from the casino’s final days, browsed through the suites looking for flat-screen TVs. They didn’t find any, so instead settled on a $15 phone, a sign from the Golden Room and another from the casino floor.

The Barretts have been going to liquidation sales at closed casinos for the past 11 years, collecting pieces such as 350-pound neon signs from the Boardwalk hotel for their living room and another from the Paradise Café at the Stardust, which hangs in their kitchen.

“We just wanted to add one sign from the Sahara,” Bob Barrett said. “We moved here in 1999 and the first sale we went to was the El Rancho liquidation. We just started decorating our home that way because we love Vegas. We brought stuff from Massachusetts, but we didn’t fill the house. It’s full now.”

But Shirley Barrett would like everyone to know, “We aren’t hoarders or anything. Just collectors.”

She said she had her eye on the fake marble tub in the center of the master bedroom in the Admiral Suite, but the couple would have to pry it off the worn carpeting themselves.

Like other pieces bolted down at the Sahara, it would cost much more than its $450 price tag to have it removed and hauled out, and probably much more than its actual worth.

Chinn Testimonial

My husband and I have enjoyed working with Briana as she is able to quickly ascertain and understand our needs, therefore eliminating time wasted looking at properties that were of no interest to us.  As we are not local, we picked properties to view from the internet and she pre-screened them for us, as well as locating others.   She would go see the properties to check their condition, and take photographs, and then email them for us to peruse, and decide which ones that we wanted to visit.  She always easy to reach, via phone, email or smart  phone.  Through her system with electric signatures, we were able to make bids on houses through our email (when we are on vacation) without having to run to a fax machine. In fact, we are working with her again because we may be interested in more property.  She is very professional and we highly recommend her.
Eva and Doug

Arcadia, CA

Yamashiro Testimonial

I was a first time homebuyer.  I didn’t know anything other than what I found online about buying a home.  I really did my research when it came to scoping out properties and Briana was the first to surprise me with her insight and knowledge of the real-estate market.

Briana knows her neighborhoods, property values and people. She was even able to help me figure out what I needed and wanted even when I didn’t really know myself.  My budget was small, but she gave me the time, energy and attention as though I were buying a multi-million dollar property.  She really knows her stuff and she’s an A-class professional.  She’s amazingly hard working and dependable and I couldn’t have asked for a better real estate agent.  It was a great experience and though I closed a long time ago we are still close to this day.  Whether you’re buying, selling or renting, I highly recommend Briana’s services.

 

-Beth Y.

Hayes Testimonial

From the first time I spoke with Briana on the phone I knew I was dealing with a professional.

Instead of the “buy now before the house gets taken!” nonsense you get from most agents, she was ready to give me an honest assessment of the market I was looking into. The house I purchased was a foreclosure, and she walked me through the pros and cons of purchasing a short sale vs a foreclosure before we even sat down at her desk and searched for properties. Her extensive knowledge and personable demeanor immediately put me at ease, allowing me to make an informed and relaxed decision about things such as: how much my initial offer would be, how much my monthly expenses would be after the purchase(stuff like HOA, insurance, and warranties), and how much money I would need to get the house livable(she knew a lot about landscaping and kitchen upgrade costs, very useful). Although I was a first time homebuyer, Briana was not the first agent I dealt with, and I can tell you, agents are not all the same!

One thing I really appreciated about Briana was that she had an office. I could call or stop by anytime I wanted, and even if she wasn’t there, her secretary could take any forms I needed to drop off and always knew what was going on. If you’re like me, nothing is more annoying than trying to talk to a secretary that is clueless about her boss’s whereabouts and dealings. The previous agent I worked with did not even have a secretary and had been working out of her car. And besides being difficult to reach, I had to fax her all the forms from a local Kinko’s. I mean, who owns a fax machine anymore?

Another thing I liked about Briana was that when we were looking at properties, I always felt like she was thinking what I was thinking. For example, one of the properties we looked at early on was one of those “don’t judge a book by it’s cover” houses, as in, the only thing going for it was its curb appeal. Rather than insult my intelligence by exaggerating the few positives within, she simply said with a smile, “It’s okay if you hate it. You won’t hurt my feelings.” We had a good laugh about the smell and moved on to the next house.

Having Briana help me find a house was like having one of my friends help me. Briana was there for me before, during, and long after the sale of the house, and being the son of a developer I can tell you that it is very rare to find such sincerity among brokers, agents, and realtors these days.

Sincerely,

Daniel T Hayes

Developers begin next construction phase for SkyVue’s 500-foot wheel

 

By Ron Sylvester

Tuesday, May 22, 2012 | 2 a.m.

Howard Bulloch can peer over the top of Mandalay Bay from 500 feet above the Strip.

“When you think of the Strip, that’s the view people want to see,” he said. “That’s the attraction Las Vegas has for the rest of the world.”

Bulloch was looking out of a helicopter hovering above the southern Strip at dusk Monday evening, across from a parcel of land that he has owned with partner David Gaffin for more than 12 years. Little more than a year ago, Bulloch and Gaffinannounced plans for SkyVue, an observation wheel on the scale of the Singapore Flyer, or theStar of Nanchang in China or the London Eye.

“People had been talking about putting an observation wheel in Vegas for years, and we just decided we were going to do it,” Bulloch said

Down on the ground, two pillars now 60 feet tall point skyward, showingSkyVue is more than just so much talk. Today, the project begins the second phase of a $200 million construction that Bulloch promises will have a wheel towering over the Strip by the end of the year.

A dozen semi trucks are set to roll into the construction site this morning, bringing enough steel cable to stretch from the Strip to the Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco to serve as supports for the massive wheel.

Plans are to have the hub and spindle for the wheel in place by the end of summer. By fall, constructions workers will begin forging large pie-shaped steel supports around the hub for a wheel expected to carry passengers late next year.

“The engineering behind it is like a big Erector set,” Bulloch said.

The wheel is going over a base of concrete submerged some 14 feet into the desert floor, where cheap hotels once stood on land Bulloch and Gaffin have owned since Mandalay Bay was under construction. The wheel will be flanked on each side by huge LED screens the size of football fields, advertising restaurants and retail shops that are part of the development.

It’s no coincidence that cable trucks are making deliveries just as the International Council of Shopping Centers is holding its convention in Las Vegas. Bulloch spent the day visiting booths at the ICSC, pitching his 140,000-square-feet of retail, dining and entertainment space.

The company has not published many final details about Project Linq, beyond covering about 500,000 square feet with a wheel about 500 feet tall.

Dennis Speigel, president of the consulting firm International Theme Park Services, has said he doubts the Strip could support two giant wheels.

“The first one out will be the last one in,” Speigel said.

Big wheel projects have been floated for Las Vegas in the past but none materialized. Now, Bulloch has various government approvals, but not the money, while Caesars has money without final approval from the county.

The popularity of the 443-foot tall London Eye, which has attracted more than 3 million riders a year since 2000, has attracted a slew of imitators from Singapore to New Jersey to Myrtle Beach, S.C. The latest generation of Ferris wheels come with enclosed gondolas — 22 passengers each for Skyvue — instead of open-air baskets.

“A giant wheel has become the icon du jour,” Speigel said.

“The London Eye has been a tremendous success,” said Bulloch, who will model ticket prices on London’s. The basic ride would cost $20 to $25.

The Monday ceremony also highlighted that big wheels are not financially foolproof.

The bearing Bulloch displayed is a leftover from a Beijing wheel that was never built. According to a spokesman, Bulloch paid about $840,000 for the unused, secondhand bearing.

Bulloch said he has received letters of intent from potential tenants for 15 percent of the retail space. A letter of intent indicates a formal interest, but not a rental contract.

At least some of the early skirmishing between Skyvue and Caesars has revolved around location. By placing his wheel right on the Strip, at a slight angle to the street, riders will get a better view, Bulloch said.

“That is the real appeal, not being off the Strip,” Bulloch said.

But Caesars senior vice president Jan Jones depicted Skyvue as relatively isolated.

“If I was going to argue location, I would rather have the center of the Strip than being on the end of the south end,” she said.